The Latest: The latest developments in the US elections

WASHINGTON (AP): The Latest on Election Day 2016 (all times EST):

2:45 p.m.

Donald Trump is rekindling his unsubstantiated concerns about a rigged election system.

Asked Tuesday afternoon on Fox News if he would accept the election results, Trump continued to demur.

The Republican presidential nominee said: “We’re going to see how things play out.”

He said. “I want to see everything honest.”

Concerns about voter intimidation and fraud led to a flurry of lawsuits in the run-up to Election Day. New voter regulations in more than a dozen states also held the potential to sow confusion at polling places.

But at least in the early going, most of the problems at polling places appeared to be routine _ the kinds of snags that come every four years, including long lines, machines not working properly, and issues with ballots or voter rolls.

2:20 p.m.

It could be the first lawsuit of Election Day. Donald Trump’s campaign is alleging polling place “anomalies” during early voting in the Las Vegas area last week.

A lawsuit filed Tuesday in Nevada court asks that records from four early voting spots that allegedly stayed open too late last Friday be impounded and preserved.

Long lines kept polls open past the 7 p.m. posted closing time at locations that included a Mexican market and several shopping centers. Officials say at one site, the last voter cast a ballot after 10 p.m.

Criticism is also coming from state Republican Party chief Michael McDonald.

But Democrat Hillary Clinton’s campaign is dismissing the Nevada case in a Twitter message, calling it “a frivolous lawsuit.”

1:30 p.m.

President Barack Obama says his faith in the American people hasn’t wavered.

Asked whether he was feeling nervous about the presidential election outcome, Obama said “I think we’ll do a good job” as long as the American people vote.

Lines were long in some areas as voters chose between Democrat Hillary Clinton, Republican Donald Trump and some third-party candidates.

Obama said he hopes everyone has “voted early. If not, get out there.”

Obama supports Clinton and voted early last month in his Chicago hometown. He spoke while walking from the White House residence to the Oval Office, following his Election Day tradition of playing basketball with friends.

1:25 p.m.

Eric Trump may have broken New York state law by tweeting a photo of his completed ballot.

The second son of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tweeted a photo of a ballot with the oval over his father’s name filled in on Tuesday.

The tweet said “It is an incredible honor to vote for my father! He will do such a great job for the U.S.A!” It was later deleted from Trump’s Twitter account.

An 1890 New York law bans voters from showing marked election ballots to others. A federal judge ruled last week that the law applies to social media posts.

Representatives for Eric Trump and the New York City Board of Elections did not immediately respond to calls seeking comment.

1:20 p.m.

It was a quick trip to the voting booth for Donald Trump’s running mate on Tuesday.

Indiana Governor Mike Pence was joined by his wife, Karen, as they voted in Indianapolis. The couple encountered no lines and spent about five minutes filling out their ballots.

Pence told a small crowd afterward that he was grateful for the “support and prayers of people all across the United States” and he pledged a more prosperous America with the Trump-Pence ticket.

Pence and his wife voted in a precinct that has leaned liberal in past elections.

1:15 p.m.

Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg says a victory for Hillary Clinton on Election Day would be “inspirational” to young women. But she joked that this wouldn’t lead to a “global girlfriends’ network.”

At a Berlin press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel Tuesday, Solberg said a female U.S. president would show women that politics isn’t “something that belongs to men.”

Merkel echoed Solberg’s comments about creating more of a global balance between men and women in power. She declined to comment on whom she’d like to win the election, pointing out that the “trans-Atlantic partnership is certainly a prerequisite for us, especially cooperation in NATO.”

Republican Donald Trump has said that he may revisit the longstanding NATO alliance if elected.

12:50 p.m.

Wait times in and around Fort Wayne are varying as the public rushes to the polls. The longest reported wait time has been two-and-a-half hours. Read more here.

12:30 p.m.

Kenyans in President Barack Obama’s ancestral hometown have held their own version of the U.S. presidential election, leaning heavily toward Obama’s own favorite in the race: Hillary Clinton.

Tuesday’s mock poll was held in Nyangoma-Kogelo, the birthplace of Obama’s father. Kenyan comedian Laurence Oyange was an organizer. He says it’s a way Kenyans can connect to America.

Oyange said the poll was boycotted by Malik Obama, the president’s half brother who has said he supports Trump.

There were 105 voters and 78 percent of them favored Clinton. Eleven percent went for Donald Trump. Other ballots were spoiled or disqualified.

Oyange says the community also held mock U.S. elections during Obama’s elections.

12:15 p.m.

The state elections office in Ohio says Tuesday turnout appears to be robust with relatively few problems.

Matthew McClellan, a spokesman for Secretary of State Jon Husted, said it’s too soon to say if turnout will break any records since the reporting so far is anecdotal.

McClellan says county election boards have troubleshooters lined up in case of any issues during the day.

Lines at several polling places around the state were long beginning first thing Tuesday.

Ohio voters were casting ballots in the presidential election, in a U.S. Senate race, in congressional and state legislative races and several local school issues.

9:55 a.m.

As voters cast their ballots for president, some are convinced, while others are holding their breath.

In Indianapolis, 50-year old homemaker Ranita Wires said she voted for Hillary Clinton because she trusts her, but said “this has been the worst,” and she’s “so glad it’s over.”

Craig Bernheimer voted for Donald Trump at his local polling station in Tulsa, Oklahoma early Tuesday, saying it has more to do with “what the other didn’t bring.”

New Mexico truck driver Richard Grasmick said he admired Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and intended to vote for him, but grew disillusioned by Johnson’s televised flubs on foreign affairs issues.

He said, “I wanted to go with Gary but he failed me.” Grasmick voted for Donald Trump instead.

9:20 a.m.

Lines were long in some places, but few voters heading to the polls early Tuesday appeared to be encountering problems.

Presidential elections usually include sporadic voting problems, such as machines not working properly. Calls to Election Protection, a national voter helpline, included people reporting long lines as a result of machine problems in three precincts in Virginia. And election officials at a handful of precincts in Durham County, North Carolina, were using paper roll books after technical issues with computer check-in.

Ahead of the election, there was anxiety over whether voters would face problems. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said the election was rigged and Democrats warned that Republicans were planning to intimidate voters. There were also concerns about hackers disrupting election systems.

8:45 a.m.

Donald Trump’s eldest son says that his family will “respect the outcome” of a “fair election.”

Donald Trump, Jr. told CNN’s New Day Tuesday that he thinks his father “will remain involved somewhat” if he loses the election. He said he hopes that the energy surrounding his father’s campaign “goes back to the people we are trying to fight for, the people who haven’t had a voice in a long time.”

He said, in retrospect, that “hopefully we shed some light on the process,” and enabled people to speak their minds freely, “without being put in some basket, without being boxed in a corner.”

8:40 a.m.

Women across the United States are wearing pantsuits Tuesday in a show of support for Hillary Clinton.

Many were inspired by a Facebook group called Pantsuit Nation that has more than 2 million members. Some are also wearing white in honor of the suffragists who wore white when they fought for women’s voting rights in the early 1900s.

In Alexandria, Virginia, Heather O’Beirne Kelly says she’s wearing a white pantsuit, inspired by the Facebook group and organized efforts to get women to wear white to vote.

New Yorker Denise Shull tried to buy a white pantsuit on Amazon, but they were sold out. She’s wearing a black-and-white suit to support Clinton, but also to symbolize “women making progress.”

8:35 a.m.

Hillary and Bill Clinton are voting in their hometown of Chappaqua New York.

The Clintons greeted supporters waiting outside the polling place after casting their ballots Tuesday morning.

Hillary Clinton said it was “the most humbling feeling” to vote “because so many people are counting on the outcome of this election.”

Bill Clinton said he’s eager to be a political spouse, joking that he had “15 years of practice.”

8:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama is keeping up an Election Day tradition: a game of pick-up basketball with friends.

Obama arrived at the gymnasium at the Army’s Fort McNair in the District of Columbia around 8 a.m. He wore dark, casual clothes and a baseball cap, and carried a pair of high-top athletic shoes. The White House didn’t say who the president would be playing with.

On the day of his re-election in 2012, Obama’s basketball teammates included former Chicago Bulls player Scottie Pippen.

Obama started the Election Day tradition during the 2008 presidential campaign.

The president has been campaigning aggressively to help elect fellow Democrat Hillary Clinton, including headlining get-out-the-vote rallies for her in three states on Monday.

8:15 a.m.

Tim Kaine is not letting the biggest election of his life get in the way of his Tuesday routine.

After voting at 6 a.m. and doing a round of national morning TV shows, Kaine met a group of friends for breakfast at the City Diner in Richmond.

Kaine and his friends try to meet every Tuesday at the diner, a few miles from his home.

The U.S. senator and former Virginia governor was greeted with cheers as he walked into the restaurant

8:10 a.m.

Donald Trump says the presidential campaign has been an “amazing process” that put him in touch with the unfulfilled aspirations of the American people.

Interviewed by phone Tuesday on “Fox and Friends,” the Republican presidential nominee said he’s seen “so many hopes and dreams that didn’t happen, that could have been helped with proper leadership.”

Trump says he “took a little heat” for bringing up “illegal immigration” from the day he launched his campaign, but “in the end it was the right thing to do.”

Trump said his campaign is a “movement” and the American people are “incredible.”

Asked if he had any regrets, Trump said “sure, there’s things I would have done different.” He didn’t name any.

8 p.m.

Eric Trump says that his father will concede the election if he loses and the results are “legit and fair.”

In an Election Day interview with MSNBC’s Morning Joe, Donald Trump’s son said that “all we want is a fair fight, not just for this election but for all elections.”

The Republican presidential nominee has repeatedly warned of a “rigged election,” though there is no evidence of widespread fraud in the electoral system.

Eric Trump said, “we’ve seen states where a few thousand votes can make a difference.”

Pressed by MSNBC anchors, he said of his father, “if he loses and it’s legit and fair, and there’s not obvious stuff out there then without question, yes,” he would concede.

7:45 a.m.

Republican Donald Trump is expressing confidence on Election Day.

In a phone interview Tuesday morning on “Fox and Friends,” the Republican presidential nominee said: “We’re going to win a lot of states.” But in a rare moment of uncertainty, he added: “Who knows what happens ultimately?”

If rival Hillary Clinton wins, Trump says he won’t be looking back positively on a failed bid for the White House. He said: “If I don’t win, I will consider it a tremendous waste of time, energy and money.”

Trump said he’s spent over $100 million of his own money on his campaign. Federal Election Commission reports, however, show he’s more than $30 million short of that claim. According to fundraising records, Trump’s investment so far is about $66 million

7:30 a.m.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine says he and Hillary Clinton can clinch the White House if they win any one of the “checkmate” states.

In an interview with ABC’s Good Morning America Tuesday, Kaine said the battleground states of North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Florida and Ohio each hold the key to a win for the Democratic running mates.

He said that Tuesday’s election is a “history-making race” but he also warned against complacency, saying that “democracy always works better when people participate.”

6:15 a.m.

Tim Kaine has cast his ballot for president in his hometown of Richmond, Virginia.

The Democratic vice presidential nominee and his wife, Anne Holton, voted shortly after polls opened at 6 a.m. at a retirement community near their home.

Kaine was cheered by supporters waiting in line.

After voting, he spoke to reporters where he encouraged Americans to vote and said that if elected, he and running mate Hillary Clinton would try and bring the country together.

“The sign of a vigorous democracy is one where a lot of people participate,” Kaine said.

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