New attempt underway to keep Ohio’s clean energy standards on ice

(Photo Supplied/Ohio News Service)

COLUMBUS, Ohio – Ohio’s freeze of its energy efficiency and renewable energy standards could stay on ice.

The initial two-year pause came in 2014, when opponents argued that the standards were too costly to implement, and now draft legislation calls for another three years.

The proposal is being circulated by state Sen. Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), who cites the confusion over conflicting mandates with a federal court case challenging the implementation of the Clean Power Plan.

But Dave Rinebolt, executive director of Ohio Partners for Affordable Energy, counters that it’s been demonstrated that Ohio’s clean energy standards would help the state comply with the federal standards to reduce carbon emissions.

“There seems to be ideological opposition to the Clean Power Plan,” he states. “And in fact, the proposed legislation changes the standards in such a way that it would reduce their ability to help us comply with the Clean Power Plan.”

Ohio’s clean energy standards require utilities to reduce customers’ power use by 22 percent and get 25 percent of their power from renewable sources by 2025.

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